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Category Archives: Pond Turtles

Pond Turtles outside of Bangkok

Several other Pond Turtle species can be found in Thailand outside of Bangkok. They include:
 

Asian Leaf Turtle

Asian Leaf Turtle Cyclemys dentata

 
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Posted by on June 14, 2013 in Pond Turtles, Turtles

 

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Red-eared Slider

Trachemys scripta elegans

Red-eared Slider Trachemys scripta elegans

Red-eared Slider basking in canal in Lumpani

Red-eared Terrapin Trachemys scripta elegans

Two Red-eared Sliders basking in canal in Lumpani

Red-eared Slider Trachemys scripta elegans swimming

Red-eared Slider swimming in canal in Lumpani

Older Red-eared Slider with darkened red mark basking in decorative pond in Khlong Toei

Red-eared Slider Trachemys scripta elegans

Red-eared Slider swimming in lake in natural habitat in Missouri, USA

Red-eared Terrapin Trachemys scripta elegans melanistic

Melanistic (dark phase) Red-eared Slider basking in California, USA

Red-eared Slider Trachemys scripta elegans head shot

Head shot of Red-eared Slider in California, USA

English name: Red-eared Slider (aka “Pond Slider”, “Red-eared Terrapin”)
Scientific name: Trachemys scripta elegans
Thai name:

Description: Shell is up to 37 cm long. An average-to-large turtle with a relatively flat shell. Head is black with yellow lines and a distinct red mark behind the eye that fades with old age. Shell is dark green to brown or black with yellow lines that fade with age. Underside of shell is yellow with a black marks.

Similar Species: Malayan Snail-eating Turtle has a shell with three distinct keels and lacks a red mark behind the eye.
Southeast Asian Box Turtle has a higher shell and lacks the red mark behind the eye.
Black Marsh Turtle has no yellow or red markings and has upturned edges on the mouth.
On occasion other North American turtles can show up in Bangkok, such as this Mississippi Map Turtle, but that is uncommon. None of them have the characteristic red mark of the Red-eared Slider.

Habitat: In Bangkok this turtle can be found in any calm body of water, especially those frequented by people. They are often seen basking on logs and rocks in the water or on the banks of canals during the day.

Contribution to the ecosystem: Will eat both plant and animal material, including insects, worms, small fish, tadpoles, carrion, snails, crabs, and water plants. Their young and eggs provide food for water monitors and some wading birds.

Danger to humans: This turtle can bite, but is not significantly dangerous to humans. Like many reptiles it can carry salmonella bacteria in its feces, and young children should not handle the turtles.

Conservation status and threats: The Red-eared Slider is not native to Asia, despite being common in many cities. The Global Invasive Species Database lists it as one of the world’s 100 Worst Invasive Species http://www.issg.org/database/species/search.asp?st=100ss. It is common and widespread in North America and does not face any conservation threats. It is also now found in most of Europe, the Middle East, Brazil, South Africa, Australia, East Asia, and most Southeast Asian countries. The import of Red-eared Sliders has now been banned in the European Union and several Asian countries and is restricted in much of the United States.

Interesting facts: Red-eared Sliders have come to Asia via the pet trade, where they are popular due to their colorful appearance and small size as hatchlings. Between 3 million and 8 million Red-eared Sliders are distributed through the pet trade every year. However, they get significantly larger and duller as they grow and are often released by owners who no longer wish to take care of them. They are also released at times as a “merit release”. It is possible that some sliders are released through food markets as well.

Despite its status as a non-native species, the Red-eared Slider is the most common species in many Bangkok ponds. Red-eared Sliders are able to breed in in the wild in Thailand and ecologists worry that they will soon spread out from the cities to many more wild habitats. In the western United States the Red-eared Slider is seen to be a threat to native Western Pond Turtle populations, in Europe they are seen to negative impact European Pond Turtles, and in China populations of native Reeve’s Turtles have dropped in places where Red-eared Sliders were introduced. It is classified as a Class 1 Pest Species in Australia. There are serious concerns that Red-eared Sliders could have a negative competitive impact on Bangkok’s already-vulnerable native turtle species. Also, turtle farms often operate under disease-filled conditions, and thus released pet turtles could spread diseases both to the native turtle population and to humans.

References:
Global Invasive Species Database: Trachemys scripta elegans
Ecology Asia: Red-eared Terrapin
California Herps: Red-eared Slider
IUCN Red List: Trachemys scripta.
USGS: Trachemys scripta elegans.
Wikipedia: Red-eared Slider
A Photographic Guide to Snakes and Other Reptiles of Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand
Biological Invaders in Inland Waters: Profiles, Distribution, and Threats

 
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Posted by on November 29, 2011 in Pond Turtles, Turtles

 

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Black Marsh Turtle

Siebenrockiella crassicollis

Black Marsh Turtle Siebenrockiella crassicollis

Black Marsh Turtle found on edge of canal in Lumpani

Black Mud Turtle Siebenrockiella crassicollis head

Head shot of Black Marsh Turtle

Smiling Terrapin Siebenrockiella crassicollis head

Head shot of Black Marsh Turtle from front

Black Terrapin Siebenrockiella crassicollis

Black Marsh Turtle eating discarded food

Black Marsh Turtle Siebenrockiella crassicollis foraging

Another Black Marsh Turtle foraging for food on canal edge in Lumpani

Black Marsh Turtle Siebenrockiella crassicolli

Black Marsh Turtle in Cambodia (photo courtesy of Koulang Chey)

Black Marsh Turtle for sale in Oh Nut market

Black Marsh Turtle for sale in Oh Nut market

English name: Black Marsh Turtle (aka “Black Mud Turtle”, “Black Terrapin”, or “Smiling Terrapin”)
Scientific name: Siebenrockiella crassicollis
Thai name: Tao Dam

Description: Shell is up to 30cm long. A small turtle species with a keeled shell. Shell and body are black, sometimes with brown streaks. Head is large and black and sometimes has round white spots, which may be distinct or faded. The distinctly upturned mouth has given it the alternative name, “Smiling Terrapin”.

Similar Species: Malayan Snail-eating Turtle has light stripes on the head rather than pale spots.
Southeast Asian Box Turtle has a higher shell and light stripes on the head.
Red-eared Slider has red and yellow markings on its head.
Giant Asian Pond Turtle has a higher shell and is much larger.

Habitat: Found in marshes, swamps, ponds, and other shallow, slow-moving water bodies with dense vegetation. Spends most of the day at the muddy water bottoms, only surfacing occasionally. Will sometimes come onto the banks at night to forage.

Contribution to the ecosystem: Helps clean up discarded food and rotting plants and animals, as well as controlling snail, insect, worm, crustacean, and shellfish populations. Provides food for water monitors and wading birds.

Danger to humans: Is not dangerous to humans. When threatened, it will release a foul-smelling musk.
These turtles have been found to have high levels of mercury in their flesh, due to their long lives and the high levels of pollution in the water bodies in which they are found. They should not be eaten.

Conservation status and threats: The Black Marsh Turtle is classified as “Vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List and is listed in CITES Appendix II. In Cambodia and Vietnam it is considered Endangered. The greatest threats to this turtle are hunting and capture for the pet trade and “merit-making”, and in Thailand it is also threatened by habitat loss. Besides their meat, they are also hunted for their shells, which are used in traditional Chinese medicine.

Interesting facts: Black Marsh Turtles are often released into temple ponds and other artificial habitats. Some Thai people believe that the Black Marsh Turtle carries the souls of people who died while trying to rescue others from drowning, and thus they are treated as sacred.

The only time I have seen this turtle was while waiting for a bus at night in downtown Bangkok. While I was waiting I took a look at the nearby canal, and was surprised to see three Black Marsh Turtles prowling the edge of the water. They swam alongside the concrete banks, occasionally climbing up onto land to reach discarded food. I had my camera with me and was able to take the photos shown in this species account. Though I had been to that canal many times before, I had never seen a Black Marsh Turtle there. It’s a good lesson for herping in the city – always keep a look out, because you never know when your one chance to see a particular herp might come.

References:
ARKive: Black Marsh Turtle
Asian Turtle Conservation Network: Siebenrockiella crassicollis
IUCN Red List: Siebenrockiella crassicollis
Wikipedia: Black Marsh Turtle
Buddhist Merit-making Turtle Release Checklist
Thailand Office of Environmental Planning and Policy: A Checklist of Amphibians and Reptiles in Thailand
A Photographic Guide to Snakes and Other Reptiles of Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand
A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia
The Turtles of Thailand

 
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Posted by on October 23, 2011 in Pond Turtles, Turtles

 

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Malayan Snail-eating Turtle

Malayemys subtrijuga and Malayemys macrocephala

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle Malayemys macrocephala

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle in lake in Chatuchak

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle Malayemys subtrijuga

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle outside artificial lake in Phra Khanong

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle Malayemys subtrijuga

Large Malayan Snail-eating Turtle found near canal in Rangsit

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle Malayemys macrocephala head shot

Head shot of Malayan Snail-eating Turtle

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle Malayemys subtrijuga

Malayan Snail-eating Turtles basking in decorative pond in Khlong Toei

Malayan Snail-eating Turtles Malayemys macrocephala

Malayan Snail-eating Turtles out at night in canal in Chatuchak

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle Malayemys subtrijuga

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle in lake in Prawet

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle Malayemys subtrijuga juvenile

Juvenile Malayan Snail-eating Turtle found in lake in Prawet

Malayan Snail-eating Turtles on sale for food in Oh Nut market

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle Malayemys macrocephala

Malayan Snail-eating Turtle on sale at Oh Nut Market

English name: Malayan Snail-eating Turtle (also known as “Rice-field Terrapin”)
Scientific name: Malayemys subtrijuga is the traditional scientific name. Malayan Snail-eating Turtles from central and Western Thailand, including the Bangkok area, have recently been described as a separate species, Malayemys macrocephala, which can be differentiated by the number of stripes on the head.  Since they are otherwise similar they will be treated as the same for the purposes of this account.
Thai name: Tao Na

Description: Shell is up to 30cm long. Has a brown shell with three distinct ridges, or “keels”, along the top. Edge and bottom of shell are yellowish. Head is black with white or yellow lines that curve around the eye on top and bottom.

Similar Species: The Southeast Asian Box Turtle has a domed shell, lacks the triple shell ridges, and has yellow head stripes that go straight across the head both above and into the eye rather than curving around it.
Black Marsh Turtle is all black, lacks the light stripes on the head, and only has one keel on top of its shell.
Red-eared Slider lacks the triple shell ridges and has a red spot behind its eye.

Habitat: This turtle is found in slow-moving bodies of water with muddy bottoms and lots of vegetation, such as marshes, swamps, rice paddies, and irrigation canals. In Bangkok it is most often found in the slow-moving canals of city parks, but I have also found it in the ponds of undeveloped areas.

Contribution to the ecosystem: The Malayan Snail-eating Turtle helps to control snail populations, which form almost its entire diet. On occasion it will also eat mussels, crabs, shrimp, and insects. It is preyed upon by monitors, and the young can be preyed on by large fish, snakes, wading birds, and crows.

Danger to humans:  There is a small risk of salmonella contamination if the feces of the turtle reach the mouth of a young child (most often occurs from handling pet turtles). To be safe it is recommended that you wash your hands after handling any turtle. Otherwise these turtles are completely harmless.

Conservation status and threats: The Malayan Snail-eating Turtle is subject to habitat destruction in its native river valleys and is under pressure from collection for food markets and Chinese medicine. It is also collected in smaller numbers for the pet trade and for “merit release”. Habitat deterioration, pesticides, and fishing nets may also affect populations. While it is still common in Thailand, it is becoming rare in neighboring counties and outside of Thailand it has been assessed as “Vulnerable” by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is also listed in CITES Appendix II.

Interesting facts: The Malayan Snail-eating Turtle has a large head and strong jaws, which enables it to crush the shells of snails. Due to its unusual diet, among other factors, the Malayan Snail-eating Turtle tends to do poorly in captivity and does not make a good pet.

The Malayan Snail-eating Turtle is probably the Thai turtle species most often used in the practice of “merit release”, where turtles and other animals are released into nature in order to “make merit”. Sadly, many such turtles are released into inappropriate or overcrowded habitats (such as decorative park and temple ponds) and end up dying after a long period of starvation or overcompetition. Other released turtles spread diseases that they caught in captivity into wild populations, thereby killing many more turtles. More information on turtle release and merit-making can be found at the Buddhist Merit-making Turtle Release Checklist.

References:
Turtles of the World
The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: Malayemys subtrijuga
PROPOSAL: Inclusion of Malayemys subtrijuga in Appendix II
Nam Kading Research and Training Center: Malayan Snail Eating Turtle
Wikipedia: Malayemys subtrijuga
The Reptile Database: Malayemys subtrijuga
Geographic Variation and Systematics in the South-East Asian Turtles of the Genus Malayemys
Buddhist Merit-making Turtle Release Checklist
Checklist of Amphibians and Reptiles in Thailand
A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia
The Turtles of Thailand

 
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Posted by on October 22, 2011 in Pond Turtles, Turtles

 

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Yellow-headed Temple Turtle

Hieremys annandalii

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle (Hieremys annandalii)

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle ill near canal in Lumpani

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle (Hieremys annandalii)

Frontal shot of Yellow-headed Temple Turtle

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle (Hieremys annandalii)

Head shot of Yellow-headed Temple Turtle

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle (Hieremys annandalii)

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle on shore in Chatuchak

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle (Hieremys annandalii)

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle in canal in Chatuchak

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle Hieremys annandalii

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle in decorative pond in Khlong Toei

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle (Hieremys annandalii) head shot

Head shot of Yellow-headed Temple Turtle in pond in Phra Khanong

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle (Hieremys annandalii) feeding

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle feeding on berries in lake in Chatuchak

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle Hieremys annandalii juvenile

Young Yellow-headed Temple Turtle in Cambodia (photo courtesy of Koulang Chey)

Yellow-headed Temple Turtle (Hieremys annandalii) juvenile

Juvenile Yellow-headed Temple Turtle in pond in Phra Khanong

English name: Yellow-headed Temple Turtle
Scientific name: Hieremys annandalii
Thai name: Tao Bung Hua Leong or Tao Wat

Description: Shell is up to 51cm long. One of the largest freshwater turtles in southeast Asia, sometimes weighing up to 12 kilograms. Young juveniles has a light keel going down the center of their shells, but the shells of adults are flattened on top. Shell coloration is dark grey to black above and yellow to pale orange below with black blotches. Head is large and gray to black with yellow speckling and yellow jaws.

Similar Species: Giant Asian Pond Turtle has orangish markings on the head instead of yellow and maintains the ridge on the center of its shell into adulthood.

Habitat: Found in swamps, ponds, canals, and slow-moving rivers. Will sometimes come on land to eat vegetation and fruit.

Contribution to the ecosystem: Helps control aquatic vegetation. Also eats fruit and vegetation on land. Juvenile Yellow-headed Temple Turtles provide food for water monitors and some wading birds.

Danger to humans: Is not dangerous to humans.

Conservation status and threats: The Yellow-headed Temple Turtle is an endangered species. It is captured and traded for meat, Chinese medicine, and merit release. It also faces habitat loss. The Yellow-headed Temple Turtle is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List and is on CITES Appendix II.

Interesting facts: Yellow-headed Temple Turtles are much more common in Bangkok’s parks and ponds than they are in their native environment. These turtles’ large size makes them very susceptible to capture and exploitation by the illegal wildlife trade. When turtles like this are taken out of their native environment and sold into the pet trade or released back into temple ponds for “merit release”, it disrupts their wild ecosystem and takes away from the beauty of Thailand’s wild places. Please do what you can to protect Thailand’s wildlife by refusing to buy or sell our native turtles.

References:
ARKive: Yellow-headed Temple Turtle
IUCN Red List: Heosemys annandalii
Buddhist Merit-making Turtle Release Checklist
Thailand Office of Environmental Planning and Policy: A Checklist of Amphibians and Reptiles in Thailand
A Photographic Guide to Snakes and Other Reptiles of Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand
A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia
The Turtles of Thailand

 
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Posted by on October 22, 2011 in Pond Turtles, Turtles

 

Giant Asian Pond Turtle

Heosemys grandis

Giant Asian Pond Turtle Heosemys grandis

Giant Asian Pond Turtle in Cambodia (photo courtesy of Koulang Chey)

Michael Cota Giant Asian Pond Turtle Northeast Thailand Heosemys grandis

Giant Asian Pond Turtle in Northeast Thailand (photo courtesy of Michael Cota)

Giant Asian Pond Turtle Heosemys grandis

Giant Asian Pond Turtle in Khao Phra Thaew (photo courtesy of http://www.khaophrathaew.org)

Giant Asian Pond Turtle Heosemys grandis

Front view of Giant Asian Pond Turtle (photo courtesy of http://www.khaophrathaew.org)

Giant Leaf Turtle Heosemys grandis

Younger Giant Asian Pond Turtle found in Cambodia (photo courtesy of Jodi Rowley)

Giant Asian Pond Turtle Heosemys grandis head

Head shot of Giant Asian Pond Turtle (photo courtesy of Jodi Rowley)

zulkifli ishak malaysia giant asian pond turtle Michael Cota Giant Asian Pond Turtle Northeast Thailand Heosemys grandis

Giant Asian Pond Turtle surfacing for air in Malaysia (photo courtesy of Zulkifli Ishak)

English name: Giant Asian Pond Turtle (aka “Giant Asian Pond Terrapin” or “Giant Leaf Turtle”)
Scientific name: Heosemys grandis
Thai name: Tao Wai

Description: Shell is up to 48cm long. One of the largest freshwater turtles in Southeast Asia, weighing up to 12 kilograms. Shell is large and of medium height with a light brown keel going down the center and serrated edges along the back. Shell coloration is brown to black. Bottom of shell is yellow with black blotching and black lines radiating out from the blotches. Head is thick and colored grayish-green to brown with a network of orange markings and cream jaws. Feet are large and toes are webbed.

Similar Species: Yellow-headed Temple Turtle has yellow markings on the head rather than orange and adults lack the keel on the shell.

Habitat: Found in stagnant or slow-moving streams, rivers, lakes, swamps, and marshes. Leaves the water to forage from the surrounding land, often hiding under low vegetation.

Contribution to the ecosystem: Primarily eats plant matter, but also helps control aquatic insect, worm, and mollusk populations. Also eats fruit on land. Young Giant Asian Pond Turtles provide food for monitors and wading birds.

Danger to humans: Is not dangerous to humans.

Conservation status and threats: The Giant Asian Pond Turtle is hunted for its meat and for traditional Chinese medicine. It also faces habitat loss due to pollution and the draining of wetlands. It is considered vulnerable across its entire range by the IUCN Red List and is listed on CITES Appendix II.

Interesting facts: Giant Asian Pond Turtles can sometimes be seen in the ponds of Buddhist temples, along with many other turtle species. One reason for this is the practice of “merit release”, where turtles and other animals are released into the wild in order to “make merit”. Most of these turtles are part of the illegal wildlife trade. Sadly, many such turtles are released into inappropriate or overcrowded habitats (such as decorative park and temple ponds) and end up dying after a long period of starvation or overcompetition. Other released turtles spread diseases that they caught in captivity into wild populations, thereby killing many more turtles. More information on turtle release and merit-making can be found at the Buddhist Merit-making Turtle Release Checklist.

References:
Asian Turtle Conservation Network: Heosemys grandis
ARKive: Giant Asian Pond Turtle
IUCN Red List: Heosemys grandis
Nam Kading Research and Training Center: Giant Asian Pond Turtle
Buddhist Merit-making Turtle Release Checklist
Thailand Office of Environmental Planning and Policy: A Checklist of Amphibians and Reptiles in Thailand
The Turtles of Thailand
A Photographic Guide to Snakes and Other Reptiles of Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand
A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia

 
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Posted by on October 22, 2011 in Pond Turtles, Turtles

 

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Southeast Asian Box Turtle

Cuora amboinensis

Southeast Asian Box Turtle Cuora amboinensis

Southeast Asian Box Turtle basking in pond in Khlong Toei

Southeast Asian Box Turtle Cuora amboinensis with sliders

Southeast Asian Bow Turtle sunning with red-eared sliders

Malayan Box Turtle Cuora amboinensis

Southeast Asian Box Turtle in canal in Lumpani

Malayan Box Turtle Cuora amboinensis

Southeast Asian Box Turtles sunning in Chatuchak

Malayan Box Turtle Cuora amboinensis

Southeast Asian Box Turtle found in grass in Khao Yai

Southeast Asian Box Turtle Cuora amboinensis ventral shell

Underside of Southeast Asian Box Turtle shell

Southeast Asian Box Turtle Cuora amboinensis

Southeast Asian Box Turtle being sold in Oh Nut market

English name: Southeast Asian Box Turtle (aka “Malayan Box Turtle”)
Scientific name: Cuora amboinensis
Thai name: Ging-ga-noi Tao Hub or Tao Gnub

Description: Shell is up to 25 cm long. Weighs up to 1.6 kgs. An average-sized turtle with a high shell. Head is black above and yellow below, with straight yellow lines on black section. Shell is brown to black. Bottom of shell is yellowish with large dark markings. The shell has a hinge on the bottom that allows the turtle to pull in its head and close its shell partway when threatened. A single keel can be seen going up the middle of the shell.

Similar Species: Malayan Snail-eating Turtle has a lower shell with three distinct keels, a line on its head that curves around the eye rather than going straight through it, and often has white lines on the head rather than yellow.
Black Marsh Turtle has a lower shell and lacks the light stripes on the head.
Red-eared Slider has a flatter shell and a characteristic red mark behind its eye.

Habitat: Found in rivers, lakes, marshes, swamps, irrigated plantations, canals, and rice paddies. In Bangkok can be found in park canals and decorative ponds. Prefers slow-moving or still water with a soft bottom. Is equally comfortable on land and in the water, and can sometimes be found a distance the from water source.

Contribution to the ecosystem: Helps control water plants, mollusks, worms, and insects. Also eat fruit and fungi, in some cases helping to spread the seeds of fruit trees. Their young and eggs provide food for water monitors and some wading birds.

Danger to humans: This turtle is not dangerous to humans in any way.

Conservation status and threats: The Southeast Asian Box Turtle is widespread and was once very common, but now faces heavy pressure due to hunting and collection. It is currently the most-exploited hard-shelled turtle in Asia, being taken for food, for Chinese medicine, and for the pet trade. Individual exporters have been found to export several hundred thousand turtles in a single year. Because of its slow growth (it takes 5 to 9 years to mature), it has now become endangered or extinct in many parts of its range. It is listed as “Vulnerable” by the IUCN Red List and is listed in Appendix II on CITES. TRAFFIC Southeast Asia has an extensive report on the status and exploitation of Southeast Asian Box Turtles in Malaysia. TRAFFIC has also found that over two million of these turtles are being exported from Indonesia every year, leading to a massive reduction in population in many areas.

Accoring to the IUCN, the Southeast Asian Box Turtle is now an endangered species in Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, and Bangladesh. It is listed as Vulnerable (the level just above endangered) in Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and India.

Interesting facts: “Box Turtles” get their name from their unique defense mechanism. Unlike other water turtles, box turtles have a hinge on the bottom of their shell that allows both ends of the shell to move up. When the Southeast Asian Box Turtle is frightened, it can pull in its head and legs and then bend its lower shell until it almost touches the upper shell. This gives the turtle’s vulnerable soft spots a greater deal of protection than the typical turtle shell provides. The Southeast Asian Box Turtle is the only turtle in Thailand with this ability. Unfortunately, while protecting it from traditional carnivorous predators, it does nothing to protect it from human collectors.

References:
Asian Turtle Conservation Network: Cuora amboinensis
Ecology Asia: Malayan Box Terrapin
Box turtles face knockout as Indonesian traders export 100 times quota
IUCN Red List: Cuora amboinensis
Science in CITES: The biology and ecology of the Southeast Asian Box Turtle Cuora amboinensis and its uses and trade in Malaysia
Wikipedia: Amboina Box Turtle
Thailand Office of Environmental Planning and Policy: A Checklist of Amphibians and Reptiles in Thailand
A Photographic Guide to Snakes and Other Reptiles of Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand
A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia
The Turtles of Thailand

 
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Posted by on October 21, 2011 in Pond Turtles, Turtles

 

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