Lygosoma siamensis

Short-limbed Supple Skink Lygosoma quadrupes
Siamese Supple Skink found under log in Chatuchak

Short-limbed Supple Skink Lygosoma quadrupes
Siamese Supple Skink from above

Short-limbed Supple Skink Lygosoma quadrupes foot
Reduced foot and toes of Siamese Supple Skink

Short-limbed Supple Skink Lygosoma quadrupes
Siamese Supple Skink found under rock in Lumpani

short-limbed supple skink Lygosoma quadrupes limpani
Siamese Supple Skink in Lumpani (photo by Mourits Horst Lovholt)

Short-limbed Supple Skink Lygosoma quadrupes light phase
Siamese Supple Skink found under log in Lumpani

Short-limbed Supple Skink Lygosoma quadrupes underbelly
Underbelly of Siamese Supple Skink

Short-limbed Supple Skink Lygosoma quadrupes
Siamese Supple Skink found in Chatuchak

Short-limbed Supple Skink Lygosoma quadrupes top of head
Top of head of Siamese Supple Skink

Short-limbed Supple Skink Lygosoma quadrupes
Head shot of Siamese Supple Skink

English name: Siamese Supple Skink (formerly “Short-limbed Supple Skink”)
Scientific name: Lygosoma siamensis (formerly Lygosoma quadrupes)
Thai name: Ching-laen-reao Ka Lek or Mea Ngu

Description: To 20 cm long. Snout to base of tail is up to 9.6 cm. An extremely elongated skink with very small legs. Color varies from grey to yellow-brown to bronze, with very thin dark lines running down the body. Head is small and slender. Tail is as thick as the body and about the same length. Legs and toes are so small they can often be hard to see and the skink will first appear to be a snake. Underside is lighter than rest of body and can have a pinkish tint.

Similar Species: Bowring’s Supple Skink is not as slender, has more distinct limbs, and usually has much more coloration.

Habitat: Naturally found in forests, but has adapted to agricultural land, city parks and empty lots. Usually found under rotten logs or in moist leaf litter and soil.

Place in the ecosystem: Eats insects, especially termites. Eaten by snakes and larger lizards.

Danger to humans: This lizard is too small to bite humans and poses no danger to anyone.

Conservation status and threats: Is a widespread and common species that has no known conservation threats.

Interesting facts: The Siamese Supple Skink represents an extreme in leg evolution. The very small legs allow the skink to maneuver through dirt and rotting vegetation without its legs getting in the way. When trying to escape from predators, the skink will fold its legs against its body and wiggle like a snake.

References:
New Supple Skink from Indochina and Redescription of Lygosoma quadrupes
A Photographic Guide to Snakes and Other Reptiles of Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand
A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia