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Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko

06 May

Dixonius siamensis

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko Dixonius siamensis

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko active at night in Kanchanaburi Province

Spotted Ground Gecko Dixoneus siamensis

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko at night in Chiang Mai Province

Spotted Ground Gecko Dixonius siamensis

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko with tail missing found in drain in Payao Province

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko found under log in Kanchanaburi Province

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko Dixonius siamensis

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko found under log in Kanchanaburi Province

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko Dixonius siamensis

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko found under board in Kanchanaburi Province

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko Dixoneus siamensis juvenile

Juvenile Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko at night in Chonburi Province

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko Dixonius siamensis foot lamellae

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko foot shot showing toe pads

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko Dixoneus siamensis head shot

Head shot of Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko

Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko Dixonius siamensis

Head shot of Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko found under log in Uthai Thani Province

English name: Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko (aka “Spotted Ground Gecko”)
Scientific name: Dixonius siamensis (Formerly Phyllodactylus siamensis)
Thai name: Ching-chok-din Lai Chu

Description: To 12 cm long. A slender, long-legged gecko. Varies in color from lavender-brown to brown to grey, with pale yellow dots and irregular dark markings on the head and sides. Some individuals are patternless. Small tubercles are on each side of the body. Toes are slender and lack the characteristic lamellae of house geckos, instead having paired toepads at the end. Underbelly is white to dull yellow.

Similar Species: Sri Lankan House Gecko has spines on tail, lamellae under toes, and more regular dark markings on back.
Stump-toed Gecko has short, wide toes with lamellae underneath, lacks tubercles on sides, and has much softer skin.

Habitat: Usually found in forest, though can be found in yards and gardens in less-developed urban areas. More ground-dwelling than the other geckos listed in this guide. Hunts out in the open at night, and found under cover during the day.

Place in the ecosystem: Eats insects, spiders, and other arthropods. Eaten by snakes and some nocturnal birds.

Danger to humans: May bite when handled, but is not dangerous at all and not likely to even draw blood.

Conservation status and threats: Is common and widespread. No known conservation threats.

Interesting facts: While our other geckos are above the ground in trees and buildings at night, the Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko is patrolling the forest floor for nocturnal arthropods. At times it may explore low tree trunks for food. Because of its more terrestrial habits, it lacks the lamellae (rows of narrow fleshy plates) under the toe pads that allow house geckos to cling to vertical surfaces. Instead, it has long narrow toes built for running. The “leaf-toed” part of the name comes from the paired toe pads on the end of each toe.

I know of no records of this gecko within or near Bangkok, but it is common in most of Thailand and some experts expect that it can be found here as well.

References:
Michael Cota, personal communication
A Photographic Guide to Snakes and Other Reptiles of Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand
A Field Guide to the Reptiles of South-East Asia
The Lizards of Thailand
Herp Center Network: Lamellae

 
5 Comments

Posted by on May 6, 2011 in Geckos, Lizards

 

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5 responses to “Siamese Leaf-toed Gecko

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